The Nelson Mandela Effect

By Tori St. Clair / LifeAtStart.com reporter

The “Mandela Effect” is when a huge amount people have a clear memory of something that never actually happened, or happened in a completely different way than what everyone has thought. These people are complete strangers and remember the exact same events. This is named after Nelson Mandela, when millions of unrelated people vividly remembered Mandela dying in prison in the 1980’s, and even remember seeing his funeral covered by the news and rioting in cities. Come to find out, he actually died in 2013. Some more examples of the Mandela Effect are:

1. Everyone remembers and says the line “Life is like a box of chocolates,” from Forrest Gump, when actually the line is “Life was like a box of chocolates.”

2. In Snow White, the queen’s line is “Magic mirror on the wall,” instead of “Mirror mirror on the wall” like everyone says and remembers it to be.

3. Many people remember the old cartoon Looney Tunes being spelled as “toons,” being short for the word “cartoons.” When actually it’s always been spelled as “tunes.”

4. When you picture the Monopoly man, most people remember him having a monocle, when in fact he doesn’t have one and never has.

5. In Star Wars, everyone thinks of the line being, “Luke, I am your father.” That was never said, the line is actually “No, I am your father.”

6. Many people remember the children book being spelled as “Berenstein Bears,” but apparently it has always been spelled as “Berenstain.”

7. The most recent example to be noticed is that the liquid “White Out” is actually spelled as “Wite Out.”

These are the most popular and well known examples of the Mandela Effect. They are all small changes from what we thought were correct, but it is strange how millions of people have gotten these wrong for years. No one knows the exact answer as to why this is going on, but time will tell.

Email: toristclair100@yahoo.com

Posts by this author: